FAQforge provides answers for frequently asked questions for the Linux-, MAC and Windows operating systems.

View wireless network passwords on Windows

Thursday, May 30, 2013 - posted by CSch

You can only do this to view passwords of connections that you are or have been connected with, you cannot use it to retrieve passwords of connections you have never been logged in with! That makes it a tool to remember what password you set here or there.

To view a password, left-click the connections icon in Windows’ taskbar and go to the Network and Sharing Center:

4On the left pane, click Manage wireless networks. You will see a list of items here, these are all the wireless networks you have been in so far with your machine. Right-click any of then and select Properties. In the appearing window, switch to the Security tab. You can see the encryption type as well as your password here. Just click on Show characters so the clear text will be visible:

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Remove a bluetooth (or other) device from My Computer

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - posted by CSch

After establishing a bluetooth connection with another device from your computer the other device will propably stay in the Devices section of My Computer even after the connection is cancelled.

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To remove that device follow these steps:

Open the control panel and head to View devices and printers under Hardware and Sound:

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You will be presented with all the devices that are connected to your machine: printers, hard drives, input devices etc. Find the one that you want to remove, right-click it and remove it:

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Block a program’s internet access with Windows 8 firewall

Monday, May 13, 2013 - posted by CSch

If you have some peculiar program installed that you need to have but want all its internet communication blocked you can do that easily with Windows’ built in firewall. On Windows 8 just hit the Windows key to get to the main menu and
- type Firewall.
- Click on Settings on the right pane and
- go to Windows Firewall.
- Click on Advanced settings on the left side of the window.
- On the left pane of the new window, right-click on Outbound Rules and
- select New rule…

Now follow the setup wizards few steps to set the rule up. That’s it! If you happen to need to deactivate the rule for a short time, you can just right-click it and do so:

fireawll

Unalign items from grid in Windows 8

Thursday, May 2, 2013 - posted by CSch

Icons on your desktop on Windows 7 and 8 are usually aligned to a grid meaning you can only place them in a certain alignment – which leaves you unable to create adorable desktop structures such as this one:

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To remove this restriction simply right-click some free space on your desktop, select View and uncheck Align icons to grid:

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Incorrent Time on Windows/Linux Dual Boot System

Monday, April 22, 2013 - posted by CSch

If you work on a dual boot system you might experience that when you log off from Windows, onto Linux, and to Windows again, the time that is shown in the bottom right corner might be an hour or more off the actual time. This will correct once you refresh it by loading the time from a time server again but will remain an issue for the next logins.
This has not directly to do with daylight savings or an incorrect time zone, but most likely with Linux assuming that the BIOS time is set to UTC while it’s set to local time. So it just changes the BIOS clock according to that. Logging in to Windows with the wrong BIOS clock will result in a wrong system time.

This Linux behavior can easily be changed though, so just login to your Linux system and open a command line. First log in as root with your password:

sudo su

Then enter following to open the rcS file (note that I use vi as text editor – you can use any other you like here):

vi /etc/default/rcS

Now look for the line reading UTC = yes and change it to UTC = no. Save the file and try to boot into Windows – if every other time setting is set correct you should get the right time now.

Hard Drive Not Shown on Computer (Windows)

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 - posted by CSch

The absence of a hard drive on your system can have multiple reasons of which I want to discuss the most common here:

New drives

If it’s a new hard drive or one that you have just plugged into that specific machine, you might want to check if the cabling is correct and, in case it’s an external one, if it has a power switch hidden somewhere on the back.
One other thing with new hard drives is that they are not formatted but have only “unallocated space” on them. This is most likely the case if your new drive is recognized by the BIOS and your device manager but doesn’t show up anyway. To check this, have a look at the device manager – you can find it by going to Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Device Manager:

devicem

In the screenshot above you see my Seagate disk drive displayed. If you’re not sure whether what is shown there really is the drive you’ve plugged in just search the internet for the cryptic name you have in there. If the new missing drive can be found here you most likely only need to format it (do that only to new drives that have no data on them – formatting will cause a complete loss of data on a populated drive). To do that Windows has a tool called Disk Management which you can find in Control Panel > System and Security > Administrative Tools > Create and format hard disk partitions:

diskman2

A new disk has none of those fancy partition blocks with colored stripes yet but plenty of unallocated space, like the one circled in red. This space needs to be formatted into an NTFS partition. Basically you can just right-click it, choose to create a new simple volume and click your way through the setup, you’ll create one big partition by doing that. Afterwards the new drive should show up on Computer.
Nearly the same goes for drives or partitions with Linux operating systems or similar which Windows cannot read. These will be displayed in the device and disk management but not on Computer, so if you don’t need the old operating system any longer and want to use the drive on Windows, you’ll need to format it to NTFS first.

Missing drive letter

Another common source of confusion is a missing drive letter or path on a drive. The drive letter is the letter in front of your drive or partition, for example C:\ on your main drive. Every drive needs one so you can access it and if it’s missing for some reason, the drive will not be shown.
The solution to that problem is in Disk Management again, so head there as described above and right-click the drive that’s not displayed (you’ll most likely notice it by the size). If the drive is already formatted, right-click it and select Change Drive Letter and Paths…. Add a drive letter of your choice that’s not already taken and the drive should show up again.

Disabled or offline drives

It can happen that a drive of yours is disabled or offline. You can check in the Device Manager if that is the case. Go there as described above and right-click the drive you want to check. If you have the option to enable it or put it online then try that. If these options fail it might be that the drive is corrupt.

Show empty drives

Windows hides empty drives by default. This usually should not be an issue if your drive is formatted but you can change the setting anyway if you want to. Go to Control Panel > Appearance and Personalization > Folder Options. In the View tab, uncheck the Hide empty drives in the Computer folder box.

Take Ownership of a File or Folder by Command in Windows

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 - posted by CSch

Taking ownership of files in Windows is necessary to edit or delete system or program files that you have no access to by default. There are multiple ways to achieve that goal, like doing everything manually through the Properties menu, applying a registry tweak or, as described here, executing a command in the Command Prompt. Note that taking ownership will not let you edit every system file. Windows has set precautions so that you don’t edit any of the most important files which may be helpful in some cases but can be really, really annoying in other.

To start off, you need an elevated command prompt which is simply a command prompt opened as administrator. In Windows 8 you can open that by right-clicking the bottom left corner of the screen and selecting Command Prompt (Admin). In Windows 7 and previous, search the main menu for cmd, right-click it and select Open as administrator.

You need two commands now: one to actually take ownership of the file or folder and one to grant yourself access rights. These are the two commands you will want to use:

For folders, use:

takeown /f folder_name /r /d y
icacls folder_name /grant username_or_usergroup:F /t /q

For files, use:

takeown /f file_name /d y
icacls file_name /grant username_or_usergroup:F /q

The commands basically only differ in a few switches that make the folder procession run recursively. If you want to edit only one folder instead of the whole recursive lot, remove the /r and /t switches from the commands. For more info on the commands, simply enter takeown /? or icacls /? into the command prompt.

If I wanted to take control of my Program Files folder, I’d need to enter the following:

takeown /f “C:\Program Files” /r /d y
icacls “C:\Program Files” /grant christian:F /t /q

Add More Tabs to Firefox Before Scrolling Occurs

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - posted by CSch

The past versions of Firefox brought a feature to it that a great deal of users didn’t like because it changed the way tabs are handled in a window. Instead of just showing all tabs at once, Firefox now adds horizontal scrolling to the tab bar in order to prevent the tabs from becoming too small to read its name. That way you can always see what’s on your tabs but don’t have a complete overview of the whole bar anymore.
In order to help out on that an add-on was created that increases the number of tabs that are visible before the overflow scrolling occurs.
It’s called Prevent Tab Overflow and you can find it in the Firefox Add-On database: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/noverflow/

Add it and it will get to work instantly. Have a look at the Add-on preferences (Tools>Add-ons>Extensions>Prevent Tab Overflow>Preferences) to see what you can actually do:

Screenshot at 2013-03-26 10:31:51

While the add-on cannot prevent tab overflow as whole, it can resize the minimum tab width down to 40 pixel (the default in Firefox is 100 pixel). A lot more tabs fit in that way and the scrolling kicks in on a point where it actually makes sense not to shrink the tabs any further.

Delete Windows.old Folders from Previous Windows Installations

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - posted by CSch

Windows takes a nice precaution for us when it comes to installing a clean Windows system on a hard drive or partition that already has a version of Windows installed: If you forgot to backup files from your old installation but already have the fresh one installed you still have a way of getting what you want:
When installing Windows onto an already existing Windows, most of the old files are stuffed into a folder called windows.old which is placed on your newly formated C:\ drive. That folder contains the most important data from your previous installation, which is the Users folder as well as the Windows and Program Files folders. This way, you have an automatic backup of your files that you can get back to if you forget to backup yourself.

Now there is one downside to this procedure: the folders that are backed up tend to get very large. They can take up several gigabyte of data, depending on how large your folders were. So if you don’t actually need that backup, why keep it?
All of you who have ever tried to delete Windows system files will already see where this is going: part of the windows.old folders are old system files and Windows still recognizes them as those. But Windows actually has a neat little trick to delete them anyway!

Open up the Control Panel and head to the System and Security section. Now click on Free up disk space under Administrative Tools:

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A window comes up that is usually used to cleanup temporary files and stuff. But we need to clean up system files, so click on the appropriate button in the Description panel:

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A similar window will upon but this time we’ll have different cleanup options. Previous Windows installation(s) is the one that we want to remove:

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As you see it is 25 GB large on my machine which is a lot of space for files i don’t need anymore. That’s why, after we have double-checked if we really, really don’t need them, we check the box next to it and click on the OK button. Confirm by clicking Delete Files on the next window and you are good to go with a whole lot of free space.