Posts Tagged ‘Linux & Unix’

Incorrent Time on Windows/Linux Dual Boot System

Monday, April 22, 2013 posted by CSch

If you work on a dual boot system you might experience that when you log off from Windows, onto Linux, and to Windows again, the time that is shown in the bottom right corner might be an hour or more off the actual time. This will correct once you refresh it by loading the time from a time server again but will remain an issue for the next logins.
This has not directly to do with daylight savings or an incorrect time zone, but most likely with Linux assuming that the BIOS time is set to UTC while it’s set to local time. So it just changes the BIOS clock according to that. Logging in to Windows with the wrong BIOS clock will result in a wrong system time.

This Linux behavior can easily be changed though, so just login to your Linux system and open a command line. First log in as root with your password:

sudo su

Then enter following to open the rcS file (note that I use vi as text editor – you can use any other you like here):

vi /etc/default/rcS

Now look for the line reading UTC = yes and change it to UTC = no. Save the file and try to boot into Windows – if every other time setting is set correct you should get the right time now.

Install Steam on Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Saturday, March 16, 2013 posted by CSch

With Steam support for Linux, there will most likely be a whole lot more games coming out for Ubuntu and its consorts. While the database of games with Linux support still grows, many titles are already available.
To install Steam on Ubuntu or Linux Mint, open a Terminal and enter the following commands:

sudo apt-key adv –keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com –recv-keys B05498B7
sudo sh -c ‘echo “deb http://repo.steampowered.com/steam/ precise steam” >>
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/steam.list’

 

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install steam

Afterwards start it with

steam

Screenshot at 2013-03-12 12:16:05

Switch between multiple desktops on Windows with Sysinternals

Thursday, March 14, 2013 posted by CSch

Surely you have witnessed this feature on a Linux system before: with a simple key combination the user is able to switch between multiple instances of the same desktop to reduce the clutter that you get when you open everything on just one desktop. That way, you can have your mail client open on one desktop, switch to another to surf the web and to another one to chat with your pals.

This feature is also accessible on any version of Windows and the only thing we need for that is a little tool that comes with Microsoft’s SysInternals Suite which is a package downloadable directly from their website filled with handy executables, most of them used to troubleshoot problems on your computer.

You can download the SysInternals Suite here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/sysinternals/bb842062.aspx

After you have acquired it, start the program called Desktops that came with it. There, you can define the key combination that switches between the different desktops – of course you can also do that manually with the help of the tray icon. You can also set it to launch on system start-up which you should do if you are planning on using it regularly.

Screenshot (9)

Desktop is also compatible with the new Windows 8 user interface. One desktop is unaffected by another one with the Windows 8 UI open.

Install Minecraft on Ubuntu 12.10 and Mint 14

Friday, December 21, 2012 posted by CSch

Minecraft provides you with really good support on Linux. To be able to play, you need to download the .jar file from the official website first (you need that from the Minecraft for Linux / Other section: http://minecraft.net/download.

After you have it, you need to check if the java runtime environment is installed: open Synaptic Package Manager and search for the openjdk-7-jre package – if it isn’t installed, install it now.

Head back to the downloaded minecraft.jar file. Right-click it and open the Properties. Go to the Permissions tab and check the Execute checkbox, close the window afterwards.

Now start minecraft by right-clicking the jar file again and selecting Open With >OpenJDK Java 7 Runtime – Enjoy Minecraft!

Activate the title bar in Mozilla Thunderbird 17 again

Wednesday, November 21, 2012 posted by Till

Starting with the Mozilla Thunderbird 17, the classic title bar has been hidden in Thunderbird. To get the classic title bar back, follow these steps:

  1. Start Mozilla Thunderbird.
  2. Open the config editor by clicking on Tools -> Options -> Advanced -> General -> Config Editor (button)
  3. Navigate to the setting “mail.tabs.drawInTitlebar” in the config editor and set it to “false” by double clicking on the line.
  4. Close the config editor and restart Thunderbird

 

Click on

 

Rotating screen in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 posted by CSch

Just as in Windows you have the option to rotate your screen into any direction in Linux, too. While in Windows you only need to press some keys, a key combination is not configured in Linux by default. But as you may have figured out, there are some terminal commands that let you do the exact same thing (you can configure shortcuts for these manually later on).

First, you need to find out how the screen that you want to rotate is labeled – to do that, use the following command:

xrandr -q

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1366 x 768, maximum 8192 x 8192
LVDS1 connected 1366×768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 344mm x 194mm
1366×768 60.1*+
1360×768 59.8 60.0
1024×768 60.0
800×600 60.3 56.2
640×480 59.9
VGA2 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
HDMI2 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
DP1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)

You will get a list of connected monitors – I have only one here which is labeled LVDS1, it says connected next to the name. Determine the one that you want to rotate here. Next, we want to turn it around. For that, we use one of the following commands:

xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate right
xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate left
xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate inverted
xrandr –output LVDS1 –rotate normal

Replace LVDS1 with your monitor label in the above commands and you’ll be able to rotate the screen to your likings! This is especially helpful if you need to go through documents and can turn your physical monitor around.

Here is a short script that helped me to copy files that have ben modified within the last 60 minutes to a new directory. The script uses a combination of the find and cp commands, it has to be run inside the directory that contains the new files.  In this example, I will copy all files that have been modified within the last 60 minutes from /var/www to the directory /var/newfiles, you can replace the timespan or target directory in the script to match your reqzúirements.

First, enter the /var/www directory which contains the files:

cd /var/www

Then execute this command to find the latest files and copy them to /var/newfiles:

find ./ -type f -mmin -60  -exec cp -pf {} /var/newfiles/ \;

 

 

Read ext4 partitions from Windows 7

Thursday, October 25, 2012 posted by CSch

Linux partitions are usually not visible under Windows operating systems. While it’s not recommended to write on a Linux partition from Windows, you can read files from there without too much of a great danger. However, a tool is needed for that – an example for that is DiskInternals Linux Reader.

You can download the reader at DiskInternals’ homepage: http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/

To browse the files on the Linux filesystems, you need to install the application and browse them through it – they’re not shown in the Windows explorer as the other hard disks and partitions are. Download the application and follow the installer to correctly install it. You’ll find an overview of all the available file systems listed:

To read or save files to a Windows system, just double- or right-click the item and select the appropriate action!

Add places icons to the desktop in Linux Mint 13 (Cinnamon)

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 posted by CSch

After installing Linux Mint 13 on your machine for the first time, you will only have few to no icons on the desktop by default. This makes accessing important files fast a chore. However, you can change this just like in the present versions of MS Windows.

To do so, go to Menu > Preferences > Cinnamon Settings > Desktop.

Here, tick all the boxes whose items you want to have on the desktop and close the preferences window again. If you want to remove them again, just repeat the process and untick the boxes again.

Uninstall VirtualBox Guest Additions on Ubuntu and Windows 7

Thursday, July 26, 2012 posted by CSch

Ubuntu:

To uninstall VirtualBox Guest Additions on Ubuntu and similar operating systems, mount the virtual disk again that you used to install them – to do that, click on the Devices menu on the virtual machines top menu bar and select Install Guest Additions. If you get a pop-up about auto-start procedures just cancel it.

Now that the virtual disk is mounted, open a terminal and look for the contents of the disk in the /media folder.

ls /media

In my case, the disk is named VBOXADDITIONS_4.1.10_76795. This name may vary depending on the version of VirtualBox you have installed. Now uninstall the guest additions (don’t forget to adjust the path):

sudo sh /media/VBOXADDITIONS_4.1.10_76795/VBoxLinuxAdditions.run uninstall

Windows:

You can uninstall the guest additions just like any other program on a Windows machine: Click on Uninstall a program in the Control Panel and search for the version you installed. Select it and click on the Uninstall button above the program list.