Posts Tagged ‘Windows 8’

While SkyDrive needed complex folder mapping to be accessed from your computer's file system in the past it is now possible to download a desktop app from the Microsoft website: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/skydrive/download

Scroll down and click the Download the desktop app button to start downlowding. Install it afterwards by double-clicking the executable:

skydrive1After the installation your SkyDrive folder will be placed in your User's folder by default:

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When there are new updates available for your installation of Windows 7 or 8, it prompts you with a Window asking you to either restart the computer or to postpone the installation for 10 minutes, one hour or four hours. Either option may not be the best sometimes, so why not postpone it by a full day in the first place? To achieve that, open the Local Group Policy Editor by searching for group policy in Windows' main menu.

In the left pane, navigate to Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update. Click it once and select Re-prompt for restart with scheduled installations. Double-click it and check the Enabled checkbox. Now a counterbox becomes available on which you can specify a number of minutes, enter 1440 for a whole day, then apply the changes.

View wireless network passwords on Windows

Thursday, May 30, 2013 posted by CSch

You can only do this to view passwords of connections that you are or have been connected with, you cannot use it to retrieve passwords of connections you have never been logged in with! That makes it a tool to remember what password you set here or there.

To view a password, left-click the connections icon in Windows' taskbar and go to the Network and Sharing Center:

4On the left pane, click Manage wireless networks. You will see a list of items here, these are all the wireless networks you have been in so far with your machine. Right-click any of then and select Properties. In the appearing window, switch to the Security tab. You can see the encryption type as well as your password here. Just click on Show characters so the clear text will be visible:

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Remove a bluetooth (or other) device from My Computer

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 posted by CSch

After establishing a bluetooth connection with another device from your computer the other device will propably stay in the Devices section of My Computer even after the connection is cancelled.

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To remove that device follow these steps:

Open the control panel and head to View devices and printers under Hardware and Sound:

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You will be presented with all the devices that are connected to your machine: printers, hard drives, input devices etc. Find the one that you want to remove, right-click it and remove it:

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If you have some peculiar program installed that you need to have but want all its internet communication blocked you can do that easily with Windows' built in firewall. On Windows 8 just hit the Windows key to get to the main menu and
- type Firewall.
- Click on Settings on the right pane and
- go to Windows Firewall.
- Click on Advanced settings on the left side of the window.
- On the left pane of the new window, right-click on Outbound Rules and
- select New rule...

Now follow the setup wizards few steps to set the rule up. That's it! If you happen to need to deactivate the rule for a short time, you can just right-click it and do so:

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Unalign items from grid in Windows 8

Thursday, May 2, 2013 posted by CSch

Icons on your desktop on Windows 7 and 8 are usually aligned to a grid meaning you can only place them in a certain alignment - which leaves you unable to create adorable desktop structures such as this one:

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To remove this restriction simply right-click some free space on your desktop, select View and uncheck Align icons to grid:

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Take Ownership of a File or Folder by Command in Windows

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 posted by CSch

Taking ownership of files in Windows is necessary to edit or delete system or program files that you have no access to by default. There are multiple ways to achieve that goal, like doing everything manually through the Properties menu, applying a registry tweak or, as described here, executing a command in the Command Prompt. Note that taking ownership will not let you edit every system file. Windows has set precautions so that you don't edit any of the most important files which may be helpful in some cases but can be really, really annoying in other.

To start off, you need an elevated command prompt which is simply a command prompt opened as administrator. In Windows 8 you can open that by right-clicking the bottom left corner of the screen and selecting Command Prompt (Admin). In Windows 7 and previous, search the main menu for cmd, right-click it and select Open as administrator.

You need two commands now: one to actually take ownership of the file or folder and one to grant yourself access rights. These are the two commands you will want to use:

For folders, use:

takeown /f folder_name /r /d y
icacls folder_name /grant username_or_usergroup:F /t /q

For files, use:

takeown /f file_name /d y
icacls file_name /grant username_or_usergroup:F /q

The commands basically only differ in a few switches that make the folder procession run recursively. If you want to edit only one folder instead of the whole recursive lot, remove the /r and /t switches from the commands. For more info on the commands, simply enter takeown /? or icacls /? into the command prompt.

If I wanted to take control of my Program Files folder, I'd need to enter the following:

takeown /f "C:\Program Files" /r /d y
icacls "C:\Program Files" /grant christian:F /t /q

Delete Windows.old Folders from Previous Windows Installations

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 posted by CSch

Windows takes a nice precaution for us when it comes to installing a clean Windows system on a hard drive or partition that already has a version of Windows installed: If you forgot to backup files from your old installation but already have the fresh one installed you still have a way of getting what you want:
When installing Windows onto an already existing Windows, most of the old files are stuffed into a folder called windows.old which is placed on your newly formated C:\ drive. That folder contains the most important data from your previous installation, which is the Users folder as well as the Windows and Program Files folders. This way, you have an automatic backup of your files that you can get back to if you forget to backup yourself.

Now there is one downside to this procedure: the folders that are backed up tend to get very large. They can take up several gigabyte of data, depending on how large your folders were. So if you don't actually need that backup, why keep it?
All of you who have ever tried to delete Windows system files will already see where this is going: part of the windows.old folders are old system files and Windows still recognizes them as those. But Windows actually has a neat little trick to delete them anyway!

Open up the Control Panel and head to the System and Security section. Now click on Free up disk space under Administrative Tools:

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A window comes up that is usually used to cleanup temporary files and stuff. But we need to clean up system files, so click on the appropriate button in the Description panel:

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A similar window will upon but this time we'll have different cleanup options. Previous Windows installation(s) is the one that we want to remove:

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As you see it is 25 GB large on my machine which is a lot of space for files i don't need anymore. That's why, after we have double-checked if we really, really don't need them, we check the box next to it and click on the OK button. Confirm by clicking Delete Files on the next window and you are good to go with a whole lot of free space.

Relocate Library Folders in Windows 7 and Windows 8

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 posted by CSch

The library folders where your documents, music, videos, contacts, etc are stored in are located in the users' folders by default. This is fine as long as you have everything on your computer on just one partition, but it may be helpful to relocate those libraries if you want to split your operating system from your data files on a separate partition because these folders tend to become the largest on the average home computer.

Before you start moving, you need to create new folders that will be used as libraries later on. Go to the location where you want to move your libraries to and create folders to replace the old ones (Desktop, Downloads, Favorites, Links, My Music etc.).
Now to get going, open your user folder, in my case that's C:\Users\christian. This is where the library targets are that you want to move. Start with any of them and right-click it, then click on Properties. On the Location tab, you'll see the path to the folder that the library is using right now, which points to our Users folder:

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Click on Move... and a folder browser appears. Browse the corresponding folder that you have just created and click Select Folder. Now click Apply - if you had files in your old library target, it is recommended to move them to the new folder; Windows will do this automatically upon clicking Yes on the appearing prompt:

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