Posts Tagged ‘mint’

Install Steam on Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Saturday, March 16, 2013 posted by CSch

With Steam support for Linux, there will most likely be a whole lot more games coming out for Ubuntu and its consorts. While the database of games with Linux support still grows, many titles are already available.
To install Steam on Ubuntu or Linux Mint, open a Terminal and enter the following commands:

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys B05498B7
sudo sh -c 'echo "deb http://repo.steampowered.com/steam/ precise steam" >>
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/steam.list'

 

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install steam

Afterwards start it with

steam

Screenshot at 2013-03-12 12:16:05

Install Minecraft on Ubuntu 12.10 and Mint 14

Friday, December 21, 2012 posted by CSch

Minecraft provides you with really good support on Linux. To be able to play, you need to download the .jar file from the official website first (you need that from the Minecraft for Linux / Other section: http://minecraft.net/download.

After you have it, you need to check if the java runtime environment is installed: open Synaptic Package Manager and search for the openjdk-7-jre package - if it isn't installed, install it now.

Head back to the downloaded minecraft.jar file. Right-click it and open the Properties. Go to the Permissions tab and check the Execute checkbox, close the window afterwards.

Now start minecraft by right-clicking the jar file again and selecting Open With >OpenJDK Java 7 Runtime - Enjoy Minecraft!

Rotating screen in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 posted by CSch

Just as in Windows you have the option to rotate your screen into any direction in Linux, too. While in Windows you only need to press some keys, a key combination is not configured in Linux by default. But as you may have figured out, there are some terminal commands that let you do the exact same thing (you can configure shortcuts for these manually later on).

First, you need to find out how the screen that you want to rotate is labeled - to do that, use the following command:

xrandr -q

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1366 x 768, maximum 8192 x 8192
LVDS1 connected 1366x768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 344mm x 194mm
1366x768 60.1*+
1360x768 59.8 60.0
1024x768 60.0
800x600 60.3 56.2
640x480 59.9
VGA2 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
HDMI2 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
DP1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)

You will get a list of connected monitors - I have only one here which is labeled LVDS1, it says connected next to the name. Determine the one that you want to rotate here. Next, we want to turn it around. For that, we use one of the following commands:

xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate right
xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate left
xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate inverted
xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate normal

Replace LVDS1 with your monitor label in the above commands and you'll be able to rotate the screen to your likings! This is especially helpful if you need to go through documents and can turn your physical monitor around.

Remember screen brightness settings in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Monday, October 29, 2012 posted by CSch

Screen brightness is an attribute that is reset automatically upon rebooting your machine on Ubuntu and all its fellow distributions. Lucky you if you find the settings okay, but on notebooks and similar machines, you might want to lower the brightness, you it doesn't suck your batteries dry.

To do that, open the following file as root via terminal:

sudo gedit /etc/rc.local

In there, enter the following line somewhere before the very last one that says "exit 0":

echo 0 > /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness

0 is the lowest brightness setting. You can adjust it to your likings!

Install Cinnamon 1.6 (unstable) on Linux Mint

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 posted by CSch

Cinnamon 1.6 will apparently be the version used in Linux Mint 14 and is already available for testing. Be warned, since it's the first release of 1.6, it will be buggy.

Open Sofware Sources from the main menu and check the Unstable packages (romeo) checkbox to make the packages available to your Update Manager.

Afterwards open the Update Manager and upgrade these four packages:

Afterwards uncheck the romeo repository again! Restart cinnamon and check if the correct version is used using a terminal:

cinnamon --restart
cinnamon --version

Install WICD network manager on Linux Ubuntu/Mint

Saturday, September 22, 2012 posted by CSch

It may occur that by default your computer won't connect to wireless networks after starting up the system. A way to solve this might be to install the WICD network manager which is available in the Ubuntu repositories.

Just fire up Synaptic Package Manager and search for WICD.
During installation, you will be asked to add system users to the netdev group - check the users that you would like to use WICD with:

Proceed with the installation and launch WICD through Ubuntu's/Mint's main menu. In the program's interface, check the network that you would like to connect with on system startup and try it out by rebooting your machine.

A connection should now automatically be build with the chosen wireless network.

Hibernation is disabled on Ubuntu 12.04 and Mint 13 by default - you can only access it with the command line. To have it as an option in the shutdown menu again, open a terminal and enter the following:

sudo gedit /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla

By that you create a new text file. Paste the following into it:

[Enable hibernation]
Identity=unix-user:*
Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate
ResultActive=yes

Save the file afterwards and reboot. Hibernation should now be an option in the shutdown menu again.

You usually notice this error due to the lack of a menu bar and all kinds of window decoration after you unsuccessfully played with your Cinnamon settings or just suffered some kind of other error. If you then try to reset Cinnamon or to use any other command involving the desktop environment, you will get the

Unable to open X display

error. While its hard to find out what actually causes it, you can easily bypass it by purging and reinstalling Cinnamon - which is a painless process and leaves your personal Cinnamon configuration untouched. To do so, log in with another desktop environment or open a command line environment by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F1. Afterwards enter

sudo apt-get purge cinnamon && sudo apt-get install cinnamon

Don't forget to log out and in again to make the changes effective. To log out without panel, press Ctrl + Alt + Backspace.

Ubuntu Linux: Install BURG bootloader

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 posted by CSch

BURG is a bootloader just like GRUB (the screen that you see after booting your machine where you choose which operating system to boot) besides that it comes with a graphical environment that you can choose themes for instead of the usual black screen with a few lines on it.

To install BURG you need to add the appropriate PPA...

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:n-muench/burg

..., update your sources...

sudo apt-get update

... and finally install it:

sudo apt-get install burg

Your boot menu will look different the next time you reboot your machine. If you need help configuring, press F1 to get a list of shortcuts that will help you. To change themes, press F2. You will still be able to access the classic styled menu with one of the shortcuts.

Mint Cinnamon: Change main menu label

Tuesday, June 19, 2012 posted by CSch

The Cinnamon desktop's menu text is changeable through dconf Editor which you can find by entering the name into the menu's search bar (don't confuse it with gconf Editor, that's something else, even though it looks nearly the same). Browse the directory tree on the left for org > cinnamon and search for the menu-text item on the right pane.

By clicking onto the field's value (Menu) it is selected and you can enter your own text into it. Remember that the main menu pops up at the center of the name label by default, so don't choose too long texts, otherwise it'll look awkward: