Posts Tagged ‘install’

Install Minecraft on Ubuntu 12.10 and Mint 14

Friday, December 21, 2012 posted by CSch

Minecraft provides you with really good support on Linux. To be able to play, you need to download the .jar file from the official website first (you need that from the Minecraft for Linux / Other section: http://minecraft.net/download.

After you have it, you need to check if the java runtime environment is installed: open Synaptic Package Manager and search for the openjdk-7-jre package - if it isn't installed, install it now.

Head back to the downloaded minecraft.jar file. Right-click it and open the Properties. Go to the Permissions tab and check the Execute checkbox, close the window afterwards.

Now start minecraft by right-clicking the jar file again and selecting Open With >OpenJDK Java 7 Runtime - Enjoy Minecraft!

Install Cinnamon 1.6 (unstable) on Linux Mint

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 posted by CSch

Cinnamon 1.6 will apparently be the version used in Linux Mint 14 and is already available for testing. Be warned, since it's the first release of 1.6, it will be buggy.

Open Sofware Sources from the main menu and check the Unstable packages (romeo) checkbox to make the packages available to your Update Manager.

Afterwards open the Update Manager and upgrade these four packages:

Afterwards uncheck the romeo repository again! Restart cinnamon and check if the correct version is used using a terminal:

cinnamon --restart
cinnamon --version

Ubuntu Linux: Install BURG bootloader

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 posted by CSch

BURG is a bootloader just like GRUB (the screen that you see after booting your machine where you choose which operating system to boot) besides that it comes with a graphical environment that you can choose themes for instead of the usual black screen with a few lines on it.

To install BURG you need to add the appropriate PPA...

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:n-muench/burg

..., update your sources...

sudo apt-get update

... and finally install it:

sudo apt-get install burg

Your boot menu will look different the next time you reboot your machine. If you need help configuring, press F1 to get a list of shortcuts that will help you. To change themes, press F2. You will still be able to access the classic styled menu with one of the shortcuts.

Install Mate desktop on Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin)

Thursday, June 7, 2012 posted by CSch

The Mate desktop was modeled after the discontinued Gnome 2 desktop because many people didn't like the direction the Gnome and Unity desktops headed towards. To install Mate on Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin), open a terminal and enter following commands one after another:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://packages.mate-desktop.org/repo/ubuntu precise main"
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mate-archive-keyring
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mate-core
sudo apt-get install mate-desktop-environment

Afterwards, log out of your current desktop session and select MATE as desktop environment in your login menu. It will be used the next time you log in.

Install Cinnamon desktop on Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

Wednesday, June 6, 2012 posted by CSch

To install Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop on Ubuntu 12.04 you have to add the appropriate ppa first. Open a terminal and enter following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gwendal-lebihan-dev/cinnamon-stable

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install cinnamon

To apply Cinnamon, log out of your current desktop session and set Cinnamon as desktop environment on the login screen. Remember that your machine needs graphical 3D support to run Cinnamon correctly.

Install Opera on Ubuntu Linux

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 posted by CSch

Opera is not present in the default Ubuntu repositories, however it is available by ppa. Open a terminal and run the following commands:

wget -O - http://deb.opera.com/archive.key | sudo apt-key add -

sudo sh -c 'echo "deb http://deb.opera.com/opera/ stable non-free" >> /etc/apt/sources.list.d/opera.list'

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install opera

Windows operating systems have the habit of installing their own bootloader on every installation - this wouldn't be a problem, if they would recognize all present operating systems. But unfortunately, they only recognize other Windows systems.

Apart from installing EasyBCD and other tools on your Windows partition to set things right, you can also just reinstall the lost GRUB boot manager with the help of a live CD (I used Ubuntu 11.10 for that). Insert the CD and boot from it. Open a terminal. If you have no idea what the name of your partitions is, use

fdisk -l

to get an overview. My output looks like this:

christian-main christian # fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976773168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000587d5
.
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 63 629147647 314573792+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 * 629147648 775948287 73400320 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3 775948288 968380415 96216064 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4 968382196 976768064 4192934+ 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 968382198 976768064 4192933+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
christian-main christian #

My first partition, /dev/sda1, has Linux installed and is the partition I want to have GRUB on - what I need is its identifier, sda1. Replace every following instance of that identifier with the one of your partition's identifier. Become root by typing

sudo -i

Afterwards mount your partition and install grub (replace sda1):

mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/ /dev/sda

If there is no grub.cfg in /boot/grub, create one using

mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc
mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev
mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys
chroot /mnt update-grub
umount /mnt/sys
umount /mnt/dev
umount /mnt/proc

Afterwards you can restart your system, remove the Live CD and boot into GRUB.

Add language packs on Windows 8

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 posted by CSch

Before Windows 8, language packs other than the one your Windows shipped with were reserved for users of the more expensive versions. This however will change in future as one can read on the msdn blog and see on the Windows 8 consumer preview.

Up to now the number of language packs is limited to a few languages but according to the large number of listed languages in the menu, there are much more to follow in the final release.

To add a language pack, open the Charms menu by pointing to the top or bottom right corner of the screen and click on Settings. Afterwards open the Control Panel from the menu and select Add a language from the Clock, Language, and Region menu. There, click on Add a language in the menu bar:

From the next screen, choose one of the many language tiles listed alphabetically and click on add (as mentioned before, not all of them are already installable). If the language pack for the language you chose is available you can double click the new entry in the menu to open its Options window. Click on Download and install language pack to get started.

After the installation, log out and in again to use the installed language. You can always switch between languages in the same menu.

Install VLC 2.0.0 on Linux Mint 12, Ubuntu 11.10 and OpenSUSE 12.1

Thursday, February 23, 2012 posted by CSch

A few days ago version 2.0 of the popular VLC media player was released, called Twoflower. Since it is not yet in the repositories, you have to add a repository if you want to update your present version.

Independent of your distribution, first log in as root:

su

On Linux Mint 12 and Ubuntu 11.10, add following repository:

add-apt-repository ppa:n-muench/vlc

Afterwards, update your sources list:

apt-get update

Finally, install VLC 2.0:

apt-get install vlc

On openSuSE 12.1, add following repository:

zypper ar http://download.videolan.org/pub/vlc/SuSE/12.1 VLC

Then refresh your sources:

zypper refresh

And finally install VLC:

zypper in vlc

You can find the release notes for the new version on the VLC homepage: http://www.videolan.org/

How to Manually Install New Cinnamon Themes (Linux Mint/Ubuntu)

Monday, February 20, 2012 posted by CSch

To manually install new themes for cinnamon from the page provided by Cinnamon Settings, first backup the data of the original theme by opening a terminal and entering

sudo cp -R /usr/share/cinnamon/theme /usr/share/cinnamon/theme_backup

Then download and unpack another theme from http://cinnamon-spices.linuxmint.com/themes, save the files to some location - I will save them on my desktop.

Then you have to copy the data from the unpacked folder to the theme folder of cinnamon:

sudo cp -f /home/howtoforge/Desktop/unpackedfolder/cinnamon/* /usr/share/cinnamon/theme

The new data has then replaced the old. To restore the default theme, copy back the backed up data.